Spreading Hope…a hat at a time.

Archive for the ‘Reblog’ Category

Belief

Little Act of Kindness that Means SO Much

Found this wonderful and inspirational and just was compelled to share. Little Act of Kindness that Means SO Much

Little Fighters Cancer Trust

chase-ipodToday I was doing some research online as per usual, and, as so often happens, came across a very relevant video about a young boy with Childhood Cancer and a store manager who made a world of a difference just by caring…

It is these small Acts of Kindness that total strangers do that make all the difference…

…to someone who may not have that much to look forward to other than pain…

… or someone who is lonely and just needs someone to show that others do care about them…

… in this case it is a Child with Cancer, and strangers who just felt that they wanted to do something to help.

It is the story of a Manager who did what was within his power to do to help. Neither the Associate nor the Manager had the slightest clue just how much this gift meant to the recipient.

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6 Stories About Dropping Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples’ Day

YWeAct

by Rebecca Calkin, Manager of Marketing & Communications

columbus-9c9217a71b23601ebe421f897d454b86The movement to drop Columbus Day and instead celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day has gained momentum over the past few years. Phoenix and Denver made the official switch and are celebrating their first Indigenous Peoples’ Day today.

Why make the change? When Columbus arrived in America, Native Americans were already here–just as many indigenous peoples were present in other areas of the world. Columbus didn’t “discover” America; he “claimed” it. As society recognizes that our history is comprised of many false “claims” to what belonged to others, it is important for this day to change.

In recent years, the slang word “Columbusing” has come to represent when people (usually white people) “discover” something that has existed for a long time, but simply existed outside of their culture. (Read more about Columbusing here).

Here are six news stories about the movement for Indigenous…

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What are the Risk Factors & Causes of Childhood Cancer?

Found a great blog… Littler Fights Cancer Trust

Fight
For those battling now
For those who survived
For those who will battle
For those taken too soon

Little Fighters Cancer Trust

cancer-stats-imageSeptember is International Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, which means that we are posting anything and everything we can to spread AWARENESS.

Today’s post is some brief information around the Risk Factors and Causes of Childhood Cancers.

Although tons of research is being done and childhood cancer survival rates have gone up in the past few decades, there are still too many Children with Cancer dying due to late diagnosis, and the incidence of invasive cancer has climbed by 29% in the past twenty years, which is why research into the causes of Childhood Cancer has been stepped up.

Please share far and wide to raise Childhood Cancer Awareness so that more parents can be aware of the Early Warning Signs of Childhood Cancer and get their child to a doctor earlier should they exhibit any of the signs.

The Best Defence against Childhood Cancer is Awareness and Early Diagnosis

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5 Teenage Cancer Innovators by TEDBlog

Recently came across an inspiring and interesting article on the TED blog with links to Ted Talks. Though it was originally written in 2012, it was republished in 2015 for World Cancer Day.

I am impressed and inspired that our future is bright….  It’s truly worth your time

Source

Some teenagers spend their free time playing video games. Others dedicate their after-school hours to a job, scooping ice cream or taking movie tickets. Still others play a sport, or are star members of a debate team. And still others spend their free time in a lab, working on ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.

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To The Child Who Gets My Little Brother’s Heart – By Jason Longhurst

A beautiful and uplifting piece…. so powerful

Kindness Blog

On March 2, 2016, my 11-year-old brother was hit by a truck while crossing the street.

The trauma knocked him unconscious, and the damage to his brain quickly stopped his breathing. Paramedics gave him CPR and doctors helped him breathe, but it was clear that he wasn’t coming back.

Because of his condition, we asked about the possibility of donating part of him to help others. Its what he would have wanted, being the person that he was, and if you are the lucky child who gets his heart, you should know what you can expect.

***

Eric’s heart was the biggest part of him. He loved more than normal people. He seemed to have an extra portion of vitality and capacity to love than most of us have.

Maybe he knew, somehow, that he wouldn’t have as much time as the rest of us, and he was determined to…

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We were all human until…..

Photo post by @armyofkind.

Source: We were all human until…..

A Love Letter to the Cycle Breakers

I stumbled across this great piece written for parents striving to raise their children differently and thought it was very inspirational and touching!  Hope you enjoy it as much as I did—

There are superheroes among us. Disguised as ordinary moms and dads, members of this league of extraordinary parents change diapers, pack lunches, and tuck kids in at night just like the rest of us. But behind the scenes, they battle forces of darkness none of us can see.

My dad was one of these superheroes. I was unaware of it through much of my childhood, though the signs were there. I don’t remember when I first took note of the cape tucked neatly under his sweater vest, but by the time I left home, I had some idea of how much time and energy he spent fighting the villains in his head.

Growing up, I heard stories and parts of stories. A grandfather beating his wife before chasing his sons down an alley with his police pistol. A mother plagued by alcoholism and anger. Six siblings from six different fathers. A precious violin smashed to pieces in a drunken rage. Bit by bit, the picture of my father’s upbringing was painted in blacks and blues. He didn’t tell us everything—just enough to give us a sense of where he came from. Superheroes must keep some secrets, after all.

Now that I have three kids of my own and a keen understanding of how difficult parenting can be under the best of circumstances, I recognize my dad for the cycle-breaking hero that he was. I’m well aware that the hell he lived through as a kid, simply by being born into a wounded family, could easily have been my own fate. The cycles of addiction and abuse, the inheritance of personal and parental tools in need of serious repair, the passing down of bitterness and rage like family heirlooms—I’ve witnessed these phenomena in other families over the years. It’s the easiest thing, for mortals to be human.

But at some point, my dad stepped into a phone booth and vowed to be more than the sum of his upbringing. He took on the monsters that followed him and declared war on the dysfunctional demons he carried. He chose to give his children the childhood he didn’t have.

And for the most part, he succeeded. I remember fun family vacations, laughter around the dinner table, prayers and hugs at bedtime. I can still see my dad giggling to the point of tears when my brother announced his pet rock pooped on the floor. I can smell his famous hash browns cooking with Stevie Wonder blaring on the record player Sunday mornings. I can hear his voice filling the room at choir concerts, plays, awards ceremonies, and graduations—“THAT’S MY DAUGHTER!” He was always proud of me. I always knew I was loved, deeply and sincerely.

But there were battle scars he couldn’t hide. I remember watching him leave in the evening to attend ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics) meetings and wondering what went on there. I recall pleasant but wary visits with uncles and grandparents and a dim awareness of extended family member drama. I still feel the grief of my dad’s beloved younger brother’s suicide when I was ten—too young to understand that my sweet, funny uncle had been fighting the same war as my dad, but had lost.

And I did witness occasional losing battles—jaws clenched, eyes flashing as the demons surfaced, changing the weight of the air in the room. I remember moments when my mother (a superhero in her own right) calmly tamed those monsters. I remember staring them down myself once, begging my father to fight harder before he silently carried the beasts off to battle alone. He always apologized for battles lost.

But I remember many more battles won. Struggle and strength manifested in deep breaths and strained brows. There was a speed and energy to his movements when he took on the rage monster. I instinctively knew to step lightly, to give him space to build his fortresses and strategize without distraction. In time, I discovered some of his weapons—faith, prayer, books, routine, decompression time, classic rock albums—and saw how much easier the fight was if he kept them well-maintained and at the ready.

I know it wasn’t easy. I’m sure he feels he failed us in some ways. My dad wasn’t perfect, it’s true. But neither is any parent—or superhero, for that matter. All have their kryptonite. But the fact that he kept returning to that phone booth defines his fatherhood for me. I admire my dad for many reasons, but none so much as his courage and fortitude on his internal battlefield.

I’ve met others like him in my adult life, and they all amaze me. It takes superhuman strength and stamina to fight the good fight every day, to drown out the dysfunctional dialogue in your head, to overcome anger and abuse. Cycle-breaking parents face a megalopolis of tall buildings, and those single bounds have got to be exhausting.

So if you are a parent from a wounded background striving to raise your kids differently, if you are silently waging your own battles the rest of the world can’t see, I want you to know that you are awesome. Parenting is damn hard, even with good psycho-emotional tools, so naturally it may feel impossible sometimes. But you’ve got this. Keep choosing that phone booth. Don’t give up.

When you feel weary, remember this: The rewards for your efforts are vast and far-reaching. You are protecting your own family, yes, but your feats also positively impact society at large. Raising kids with minimal damage is a gift to the world. Seriously. How many great thinkers and potential trailblazers have been held back by the scars of their upbringing? How much of the pain people inflict on one another is a byproduct of generations of abuse or neglect?

So wear that cape proudly, cycle breakers. Don’t be afraid to give your kids clues to your “secret” identity. You don’t have to tell them everything, but offer them a sense of what you go through in order to shield them from the darkness. I am so grateful to my dad for tackling those demons for me. Your kids will thank you, too.

Source: A Love Letter to the Cycle Breakers

People Who Make Your Nights Brighter

Positive Outlooks

Free yourself from negative people. Spend time with nice people who are smart, driven and like-minded.  Relationships should help you, not hurt you.  Surround yourself with people who reflect the person you want to be.  Choose friends who you are proud to know, people you admire, who love and respect you – people who make your day a little brighter simply by being in it.  Life is too short to spend time with people who suck the happiness out of you.  When you free yourself from negative people, you free yourself to be YOU – and being YOU is the only way to truly live. — Unknown


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I Dislike Betrayal And Dishonesty

Positive Outlooks

I no longer have patience for certain things, not because I’ve become arrogant, but simply because I reached a point in my life where I do not want to waste more time with what displeases me or hurts me. I have no patience for cynicism, excessive criticism and demands of any nature. I lost the will to please those who do not like me, to love those who do not love me and to smile at those who do not want to smile at me. I no longer spend a single minute on those who lie or want to manipulate.

I decided not to coexist anymore with pretense, hypocrisy, dishonesty and cheap praise. I do not tolerate selective erudition nor academic arrogance. I do not adjust either to popular gossiping. I hate conflict and comparisons. I believe in a world of opposites and that’s why I avoid people with rigid…

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